Mastering Modularity: A Beginner’s Guide to Structured Coding in Apex

Mastering Modularity: A Beginner’s Guide to Structured Coding in Apex

On March 31, 2024, Posted by , In LWC Essentials, With Comments Off on Mastering Modularity: A Beginner’s Guide to Structured Coding in Apex

When I first started coding in Apex for Salesforce, I quickly realized the importance of organizing my code into modules. It was a game-changer for me in terms of maintaining and reusing code. Let me share some insights and examples to help you grasp this concept.

Example Code Snippets and Explanation

In Apex, we can use classes to create modules. Let’s say we have a module for handling account-related operations. We can create a class named AccountService that encapsulates all the account-related logic.

public class AccountService {
    public static List<Account> getActiveAccounts() {
        return [SELECT Id, Name FROM Account WHERE IsActive__c = true];
    }

    public static void deactivateAccount(Id accountId) {
        Account acc = new Account(Id=accountId, IsActive__c=false);
        update acc;
    }
}

In this example, AccountService is our module. It contains two methods: getActiveAccounts , which fetches active accounts, and deactivateAccount , which deactivates a given account. By encapsulating these methods in a module, we can easily reuse and maintain them.

Best Practices

Now, let’s look at an example that follows best practices. We can refactor the AccountManager class into separate modules, each with a single responsibility:

public class AccountCreator {
    public static void createAccount(String name) {
        // Code to create an account
    }
}

public class AccountDeleter {
    public static void deleteAccount(Id accountId) {
        // Code to delete an account
    }
}

public class AccountReporter {
    public static List<Account> generateAccountReport() {
        // Code to generate a report
    }
}

In this refactored version, each class has a single responsibility, making the code more modular, easier to maintain, and easier to test. Additionally, by using clear and descriptive names for the classes and methods, the code becomes more readable and understandable.

Remember, the key to effective code organization is to keep your modules focused, independent, and well-named. By avoiding common mistakes and adhering to best practices, you can create more maintainable and reusable Apex code.

Common Mistakes

One common mistake is overloading a module with too much functionality. For instance, consider a class AccountManager that handles account creation, deletion, and reporting:

public class AccountManager {
    public static void createAccount(String name) {
        // Code to create an account
    }

    public static void deleteAccount(Id accountId) {
        // Code to delete an account
    }

    public static List<Account> generateAccountReport() {
        // Code to generate a report
    }
}

In this example, AccountManager is overloaded with responsibilities, making it harder to maintain and understand. It’s better to split these functionalities into separate modules.

Another mistake is tightly coupling code. For example, if AccountManager directly manipulates the fields of an Account instance from another module without using proper access methods, it creates a tight coupling between the modules, reducing their independence and reusability.

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